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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a particularly vexing problem facing our country. you've likely heard it before. we, the questioners often ask, well, what would reagan do? it's a good question to ask, because while times and technology and many faces have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those that speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today, governor jeb bush, understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remains an extremely important national voice in th
insisted of about 125 people. it has grown over the years and became a favorite stop of ronald reagan, first as a candidate, and then as president. what is next? guest: there is a divide. the conservative movement has become much bigger than it was in the 1970's. the republican party. the straw poll results are popularity contests, to be sure, but they are also a window into , and the people, the 3000 that voted in the straw poll, many of them would have supported ron paul in the past. another one-quarter are more traditional conservatives. about one-tenth or more are social conservatives. that is their primary issue. the social conservatives were those who supported rick santorum, so you have these wings of the party, and on these issues, they all agree, but on some issues, especially the social ones, there is going to be conflicts, especially over the next few years, as the party tries to determine the next election. coveringmes hohmann, the cpac conference, up early. he has been getting a lot of attention in political circles, and his work is available on- line at politico dot com.
much for stopping by. you've been covering every president since ronald reagan and wissed -- witnessed a lot of these occasions where reporters try to get something from the president. how have these evolved over the years? >> as you referenced. it was almost accidental. wilson thought he was sort -- simply meeting the reporters one by one, but when 100 or more pushed into the oval office, he addressed them. and then there were more that couldn't make it that day, a week later he did it again in the east room. that became the form. the first 60 years or more, there was a back and forth but it was understood that it was off the record unless a president allowed the quote. and truman and eisenhower and f.d.r. could get reporters to alter their quotes if they didn't like what they had said, sort of fix it up. the modern news conference really began with eisenhower, at least the telvized part. question?kes a good i know the answer may depend on o the president is, but what are you looking for and how do you frame your questions? >> you want to ask a -- ask a question straightforward enough
for ronald reagan's election when he got to the administration then he became a republican. and in the administration he became embroiled in the contra scandal. the attended brandeis and another east coast mostly white school which didn't help the feelings of alienation. she joined the communist party usa and rose to national prominence when she went head-to-head with governor ronald reagan in california when the border regions fired her from her position ask professor for her membership in the communist party. she was then very soon after. back in the 70's was remarkable she was charged with murder and kidnapping and conspiracy in connection with an attempt to jailbreak in the marlene county courthouse in the northern california. she went underground to avoid capture and she was captured and spent 18 months in prison before her trial which was covered the world over. so i will just feed you one more piece from that. this is when she gets captured. entering the motel in the late afternoon, angela noted in passing a dark suit and men in the lobby. she took down the now famil
debaters , please. jonathan. who is ronald reagan? need two people. oh, who is ronald reagan and jimmy carter? okay. now you've got the idea. [ chuckles ] presidential debaters for $400, please. jeff. who are george bush and michael dukakis? which george bush? george bush sr.? yes. that's right. presidentiaters for $600, please. jeff. who are ronald reagan and walter mondale?al d. presidential debaters for $800. lauren. who are bush, clinton, and perot? which bush? uh, bush i. yes. presidential debaters for $1,000. jeff. who are george w. bush and al gore? yes.
, it is hard to say. host: in april of 1988, president ronald reagan. >> george bush is doing well. george has been a wonderful vice president, but nobody is perfect. i put him in charge of anti-terrorism and the mcglove lynn -- and the mcgloughlin group is still on the air. [laughter] >> but with some -- so much focus on the presidential election, i've been feeling a little lonely these days. i'm so desperate for attention, i am considered holding a news conference. host: was there a private ronald reagan? was he different off camera than on the stage? >> he really wasn't. when you talked to ronald reagan in private, you got sort of the same stories about life in hollywood or california and politics that you often got in public. he was, in fact, a very private man. he was always cordial, always pleasant. host: did he enjoy these conferences? guest: i don't think he particularly did. host: did he look at the history -- if you look at the history, was your sense john kennedy enjoyed these conferences? guest: i believe he did. host: let's go to alex in youngstown, ohio. caller: what is his relat
years of presidential press conferences. commemoratell another anniversary. president ronald reagan and his star wars defense initiative. "washington journal" continues. we are back in a moment. >> we could take pictures of the ans and seemri sc the whole thing. there is an enormous gap about how the surface of the brain function to be able to move my hand or to look at u.n. process the information or to lay down a memory. we do not know how that works. a lot of this will be technology development. a lot of it will be nano- technology. we want to look at london's of thousands of brain cells at the same time to understand -- look at hundreds of thousands of plant cells at the same time. we do not have a scientific plan about milestones. it is getting to be an exciting moment to put something together that we cannot have thought of. nih director on c-span plus some "q & a." ofyou have been out commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since 2009. will we expect some turnover with the commission? >> we all have staggered terms. the past years have flown by quickly. we will see. i
and not an election year liability? >> i work for ronald reagan. he compromised on everything. we had a democratic house with a huge majority. he had to. the real divided government can work. ronald reagan proved it could work. clinton proved it could work. those are guys who got huge legislation enacted. the reagan economic plan, immigration reform, social security reform -- here is the thing -- the president has got to lead. >> i would say this is not the season -- compromise is not in the air. but i think that the republicans in the house realize it is in their political interest to turn the heat down and not have a food fight every few weeks for the american public. what i think is in the air and is happening is people from the far left and the far right are starting to come together against institutions and the governing parties, and you will see more of that. you saw it last week with the drones. you will see it with the banks on wall street. businesses that are impacted by the federal government in terms of getting money. there is increasingly from the left and right a coming together again
but under president ronald reagan's watch it is the first thing people associate with the name. she was free elective accept of course for the relatives of those who died in beirut to it's hard to say how it will affect her legacy that it continues to be associated with her time in office. >> host: thank you for the book and for the interview. >> guest: thank you for having me. was a pleasure. >> got was "after words," booktv signature program which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. good booktv.org and click on "after words" in the book tv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> jeffrey frank recounts the personal and working relationship between president dwight eisenhower and vice president richard nixon. mr. frank reports nixon constantly sought eisenhower's approval while eisenhower was unsure of mix and's
, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise that there would be law enforcement, and we would restore the rule of law and a million people would be legalized. but then from there on forward the law would be enforced. well, i made sure i kept my records right waiting for the ins to show up at my office, but i never saw them. neither did thousands of businesses. but the enforcement in re began era was greater than the enforcement in any succeeding administration, and now the law is so eroded, i sat in a hearing just a couple of days ago and heard la raza say, well, we want to provide comprehensive immigration reform, and after we restore the rule of law -- la raza's telling us they're restoring the rule of law by waiving it? they've eroded the rule of law. and republicans seem to forget of the 11 or 12 million that they say are here -- and i think it's 20 -- t
movement to get elected and then feign shock when conservatives call them out for bad policy. ronald reagan cemented our values with his analogy -- that conservativism stands for free enterprise, strong national defense, and pro-family social policies. if you take one leg away from the stool, the stool crumbles. if we sell out our principles then the conservative movementthose in the establishment who claim they know how to win are simply living a lie. just look at the past two presidential campaigns. how did that work out for the establishment? only in 2010, when our conservative grassroots were fully mobilized, hand in hand with the tea party did we prevail. last month the battle lines were drawn when karl rove and company announced to "the new york times," of all places, they were forming the conservative victory project. the conservative victory project is nothing more than an attempt by the establishment to control the conservative movement. calling it the conservative victory project is like mitt romney saying he was a severe conservative. tol rove claims he wants win. why does he thi
could label the republicans or start with ronald reagan, cut taxes, big chunk toss the wealthy and then borrow the money to pay the bills. that's how you get debt, $2 trillion, $3 trillion, $4 trillion. ronald reagan had this concept, starve the beast. he said the way we're going to kill social security and medicare and medicaid, we're at right now, is to make this government's debt so big that we can't afford them. >> guest: absolutely. one second, sir. ronald reagan was never in support of killing any of those programs. i mean, that is hyperbole. >> caller: he wanted to tax on the wealthy. let me finish, please, you get -- >> guest: he cut taxes across the board, sir, on everybody. >> caller: start to filibuster because i'm going to hammer you with a question. he lored the tax on the wealthy from 70 down to 40, and that amounted over the 30 years trillions and trillions of dollars being given away to the wealthy. do you think there's a correlation between us being trillions and trillions of dollars in the hole and the fact we gave trillions and trillions of dollars away to th
of the worst relationships i can remember, and i have covered presidents all the way back it ronald reagan. these leaders are not simpatico. they have leaned over backward, and that the republican nominees did too much. the white house comes to this visit clearly with that in mind. >> i want it bring in joe ruben. good to see you. >> great to be here. thanks, craig. >> joe, we heard from andrea, the perception of the president in israel. let's talk about the perception in the palestinian areas as well. talk to me a little bit about that. >> this is the right visit at the right time. the president going to israel right now is consistent with american president's past, about making a trip in the second term. and this is his first trip. and it sends a signal to the palestinians, to israelis, that america is engaged and is serious about seeing a resolution to their conflict. it doesn't mean that united states is going to put forward a plan and force the sides to the table but it is saying, clearly, and the president's been beaten up for this quite a bit, that u.s. is paying attention and tryin
. >> let me quote dick cheney, who said ronald reagan taught us that deficits do not matter. dick cheney was wrong. he was wrong then and now. of course deficits matter, but any one of you who supported the bush plans has no right to speak. i helped bill clinton balance the budget and build a surplus. why? because we had good economic times. in good economic times, you pay down the deficit, but reagan and bush did not, and in bad you have to stimulate in the near term, as thank god president obama is doing. we democrats will balance the budget once again. >> paul, which is more important to america's pursuit of happiness -- which is more dangerous, excuse me, than a 357 magnum -- >> in my home you would find 17 guns and no cans of soda pop. i have the right wing position on the giant drink soda thing. i do not like the idea, and i think bloomberg is a fine man, but i do not like government telling us what size to buy today. this one, i am with tucker and most of you. i have the right wing position on gun safety. i have the same position as ronald reagan, who was for a waiting period befo
's not certainly the same thing that he believed. and we brought up the spector of ronald reagan and he had three legs to that republican stool back then, the christian he coalition, you have the defense hawks, but you also have the small government libertarians and ronald reagan didn't preach small government because we can't afford it, but big government into the lives of american people is against the founding document. the republicans lost the argument against big government because suddenly we could afford it and look where we are now. >> megyn: it doesn't seem that rand paul is on different footing when it comes to small government. he's on different footing when it comes to foreign affairs and our military intervention. >> well, both of those positions are rooted in a constitutional argument. you can make nuanced arguments when it comes to the drone strike, you're getting lost if you thought the filibuster for 12 hours was about drones. rather seeing a republican senator stand up against the executive branch and he did something that the brilliant minds of the republican caucus had not bee
a conservative face on, but the truth is coming out now. >> talk from your perspective about the ronald reagan and his belief in god and non- churchgoing that we saw, and bill clinton, who has spoken out about god and churchgoing and family and all that. i mean, how do people deal with this? >> yeah, it's fascinating. i asked former vice-president quayle in an interview i did th him recently. i said, "you know, you, dan, are a churchgoing, bible-carrying presbyterian, and bill clinton is a churchgoing, bible-carrying baptist. so why is it that you differ on social issues?" i dot think he'd ever been asked that question before. he kind of flubbed it. he said, "well, i think it's a difference of interpretation." that's the short answer, and i think that's probably true. do i wish that reagan had gone to church more and exhibited more in his own life and family some of the things that he believed? well, sure, of course. i wish i did. i wish i exhibited in my life more consistently more of the things that i say and believe. but i don't know. it mystified me because-- mmy carter, you know, was anot
the nra in this period is in favor of verse directions on the 2nd amendment and ronald reagan and -- pushed through their right to restrict to bear arms and made this political power possible. but this really puts the party on the map. the delegation of panthers go to the assembly and protest this legislation. they go armed where the laws passed in newspapers all over the world wrote about the black panther party. this is huey p. newton at the wicker throne. i won't have time to talk in detail about a lot of the pictures. another key piece about the black and the party did, the idea wasn't it came right out of malcolm x. if you compared with malcolm x's 1953 program there is an important difference but there's a lot of development. the idea is that the black panther party were the legitimate representatives of the black community. the community had to govern in our own interest and we will take that honor make that happen. the idea was not just about standing up to the police. it never was from the beginning. the party was very much about creating stewardship and self governan
of ronald reagan and stop conservatism and just go back to the good old truth that is worked back then, that reagan laid for the incredible ground work of the economy in the 1980's and 1990's. clinton helped to some extent, ut then he created and repealed glass-steagall, and everybody blames it on george bush. the conservatives who didn't do much for the letter peace, we tried to expand under karl rove, the voting process, and giving more to hispanic community, and we didn't get one increase in vote in that eight-year period so. what makes you think that we're going to give amnesty and all the set get a bunch of votes? it's fraud, and it's another really ploy by the democratic party to keep promising and benefits to everybody who will vote for them no matter what. scommoip we're going to talk about immigration in our next segment of the "washington journal" today. but we still have about five minutes left in this segment, if you want to call in to give us your take on this growth and opportunities report that was released today, or if you think hanges in the republican debates would ha
obama give the order to have these people killed? is that what you're saying? caller: ronald reagan was not hesitating that's for sure. hal: ronald reagan would have killed the american ambassador in benghazi? caller: i heard speeches of ronald reagan and they sound completely different as they do to obama. hal: you mean the speeches around iron-contra, for example. caller: and nobody's perfect. hal: nobody's perfect. >> how can you speculate how president reagan would react in today's environment? i think milltail things have changed. hal: if policies any indication, he'd be a democratic, because he'd have to change parties after he was primaried as a republican. jacki: because he was too moderate. the nature of warfare that ha changed, too. hal: george is talking out of his posterior. you can tell with the conversion from benghazi to reagan. jacki: a cooling gel might be good for that. hal: i would say to george before he calls back in and tries on another show or either on this one to push that as a paired example of presidential egregious behavior to read up on history. there ar
for ronald reagan. he compromised on everything. we had a democratic house with a huge majority. he had to. the real divided government can work. ronald reagan proved it could work. clinton proved it could work. those are guys who got huge legislation enacted. the reagan economic plan, immigration reform, social security reform -- here is the thing -- the president has got to lead. for four years we have had a president was not willing to take that kind of leadership to make congress work. i hope he will this term. >> i would say this is not the season -- compromise is not in the air. but i think that the republicans in the house realize it is in their political interest to turn the heat down and not have a food fight every few weeks for the american public. what i think is in the air and is happening is people from the far left and the far right are starting to come together against institutions and the governing parties, and you will see more of that. you saw it last week with the drones. you will see it with the banks on wall street. businesses that are impacted by the federal governmen
of democrats and ronald reagan agreed to in the 1980's which is to clean out some of these outlandish special interest tax breaks tax breaks. and i see my good friend, senator levin, here tonight and he is going to outline just some of those outlandish tax breaks. we ought to clean them out and use a portion of those dollars to hold down the rates and keep progressivity. and in the two years after democrats and republicans did that, in the 1980's the country created millions of new jobs. no one can say every one of them was due to that tax reform effort, but it certainly helped. and we had senator enzi on the floor earlier this evening, and i've been working with her on something that i think really has been missed in the tax reform debate and that is senator enzi has said when are people going to start talking about the transition rules that you would need to actually implement the tax reform plan, because today in a global economy, and senator murray and i come from a part of the world that's so trade sensitive, here we've got senator enzi talking about something very practical that ought t
two defended the principal. sh says she's a great principal. ronald reagan waved a gun in western movies and he became president of the united states. >> ronald reagan acted with a m monkey and then became a mon president. it's not like she joined the gang. it is just a movie. and why not what ti don't know l can do because they gave her a waiver to be in this movie. soo i don't s so i don't see how they can do much other than complain. and what really should be investigated is what's going on at the school. >> that's the priority. >> i've talked about this before about teachers being strippers and porn stars. i want to say yet again i never had a teacher who was a stripper and porn star and i feel cheated. >> i'm so sorry. >> how do you really know. >> i'm not even touching that. i want to get to the other story. this nazi salute. look at this? this is how one soccer player in greece decided to celebrate his game winning goal over the weekend. his excuse and what the league is doing about this after the break. she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100%
principles fighters. at cpac 32 years ago ronald reagan attributed his victory to a set of principles, principles which were protected and nourished by a few unselfish americans through many grim and heartbreaking defeats. the reality today is grim and heartbreaking. we have so many reasons to be encouraged because we have unselfish americans around this country who are protecting and nourishing our principles. [applause] examples, examples like senator rand paul -- [cheers and applause] congressman louie gohmert. [cheers and applause] and a few steadfast, stalwart, principled fighters on capitol hill. and we have unselfish americans around this country. examples like our warriors in wisconsin who have been on the front lines fighting -- [inaudible] [applause] examples like michael -- [inaudible] jo ann terry -- [inaudible] who helped coordinate our efforts to defend representative democracy in their state as governor scott walker stood and acted on principle. [cheers and applause] one patriot stood at a town hall and challenged president obama questioning his demonization of the tea
with ronald reagan. government was the problem and government had to be shrunk. as a result, we saw pensions going away, wages decreasing. all of the sudden, i was fresh out of college, my first full- time job, and now my healthcare was part of my income. unions -- host: if you could get to your point -- caller: my point is that the republicans seem to be very focused on robbing the treasury. theking the backs of working people. there is no respect for a wage- earner or a laborer. the only people they have to answer to are the corporations. guest: i think you're basically right. first budget's director outlined a strategy in the early 1980 posts -- 1980's cold starve the beast. the right wings have noted that even republican presidents like eisenhower and nixon, you cannot cut popular programs like social security or medicare or other things, highway construction. and government grew at a slower rate than under liberals but still grew. ofy came up with a strategy deliberately cutting taxes, deliberately creating huge budget deficits. and then we will cry, oh, my god, government is going bro
again gets -- i think you need a european ronald reagan and this is my own political point of view. we need something to stimulate the public sector at the expense of the private sector. >> one of the interesting things of michelle caruso-cabrera's point and the people protesting were the bank employees and they weren't the investors. tla there's something off here independent? >> do you think pol ronald reagan can come through for the politi politics. this is almost impossible. >> right now, we'll see. >> they're not moving to the right. >> so bottom light, in a tina market, what sectors do you want to be invested in? do you stick with what has been going up? what have been consumer staples and which are historically stretched valuations that the point or do you go into technology materials and even though you don't believe in the fundamentals of this market. >> i am more inclined to go for the stocks that are providing what the fed is taking away and i know consumer staples is expensive, but by the same token financial repression will be with us for a long period of time. i would avo
't add up long term. they agree with that much as president ronald reagan and speaker tip o'neill agreed with the very same notion back in 1982 and 1983. the numbers weren't adding up long term for social security, and something had to be done. and some painful decisions had to be made in the early 1980's. and to this day we thank god for president ronald reagan and speaker tip o'neill for having the bipartisan courage to do the tough things to make the tough decisions and adjust an important program so that social security has been saved for the past three decades. we need that kind of statesmanship out of the white house today. frankly, we need that kind of leadership out of the white house. you know, we're calling for bipartisan action. i think it's worth noting -- and it pains me to say this -- for the first time in 92 years we are considering a budget without seeing a plan from the president of the united states. he announced just last week that he was just going to wait in sending us his budget plan. it will be two months late by the time it arrives, according to the president's ow
's been. right now already, it's the highest this rate has been since ronald reagan inherited a disastrous tax code from jimmy carter. that was a long time ago. of course, that doesn't include the state and local taxes which put many americans today at a top marginal tax rate of over 50%, where government is taking over half of the income that they are earning, and our friends who are introducing this budget are suggesting that all this isn't enough. we need yet another big tax increase. in fact, we need a giant one. $1.5 trillion over the next ten years in new additional taxes. i've got news for you. i don't see how this can probably be done without significant tax increases on middle-class americans. i know some folks in this chamber like to suggest that can all be done just by soaking the rich again. we just go back to soaking rich folks again. i will give you an example why i don't think that can work. the president made out in his budget last year his plan for a new whole round of taxes on wealthy americans on top of the tax increase that occurred 11 weeks ago, and he specified how he
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)